Insights on DCS migration and mobility

Many software and hardware technologies have been developed that allow companies the means to remotely monitor and control business processes from anywhere, via any device, at any time.

By Jack Smith October 9, 2020

The cover story in this issue ofAppliedAutomation位于洛杉矶圣佩德罗湾的TraPac集装箱码头是北美第一个自动化集装箱码头。在实现自动化后,该设施在相同的足迹下运送更多的货物,卡车转弯时间更快,排放减少了90%。根据作者的说法,“TraPac洛杉矶码头的集装箱现在使用混合自动化跨载机和电网驱动的自动堆垛起重机,在船只、火车和卡车之间移动。”码头的自动化系统包括卡车处理、码头(联运)铁路和海关扫描。

The second article in this issue talks about smart input/output (I/O) technology. According to the author, “Outdated distributed control system (DCS) limitations prevent open communication to smart field devices, subsystems and higher-level enterprise-wide systems. Manufacturers are looking to update or migrate their legacy DCS with smart devices to improve asset utilization, increase connectivity and enable near-real-time, data-driven decision-making throughout the enterprise. Some manufacturers jumped on the smart technology bandwagon early and are using microprocessor-based or smart transmitters. Today, many of those same facilities have yet to take advantage of the available advanced data and diagnostic capabilities and, in some cases, multiple process variables (MPVs) that come with them. To do so, they must carefully weigh the pros and cons of installing smart I/O and leverage the latest asset management software.”

In automation, many software and hardware technologies have been developed that allow companies the means to remotely monitor and control business processes from anywhere, via any device, at any time. The third article in this issue talks about advances in mobile devices, which serves as another extension of this manufacturing trend.

ONLINE extra

See links to the stories featured in the October issue linked below.

Original content can be found atControl Engineering.


Jack Smith
Author Bio:Content manager, CFE Media